Category Archives: Private Public Partnerships

Acceleration of Growth in SDP sector Through ICTs

The sport for development (SDP) sector comprises of for-profit, not-for-profit and hybrid business models that at the end of the day require revenues or donations in order to sustain themselves to perform mission-critical functions. All SDP organizations need funding to ensure sustainability for their stakeholders. This is why I have ventured into a new role with RK Global, an international growth marketing agency headquartered in Los Angeles as a Business Development Consultant.

My three-month hiatus from blogging was to assess new ways of monetizing and sustaining activities for a “win-win” situation to enable SDP organizations, the readers of this blog and myself. The acceleration of growth in the SDP sector through information and communication technologies (ICTs)  – such as the Internet, cell phones, artificial intelligence, 3-D imaging, virtual and augmented reality – create many ways for growth-oriented SDP organizations to reach more customers and people in need, regardless of whether they are in high-income or low-income countries. Ultimately, ICTs are not a panacea for all the world’s problems but can promote systems-wide action if used for good.

The bottom line is that SDP organizations do not operate in a vacuum and are influenced by political, economic, social and environmental forces. This means in order to avoid organizational shutdowns and failures, sufficient political, economic and social capital is needed. The twenty four innovative technological tools and multiple marketing strategies offered by RK Global are potential solutions for the sustainability of the SDP sector. This blog as a subsection of the Internet will not end, as long as I am able to do so. Therefore, I look forward to writing more blog posts in the future.

 

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Filed under Capacity Buidling, Coaching, Education, International Development, Leadership, Networking, Peace Building, Philanthropy, Planning, Private Public Partnerships, Public Policy, Stakeholder Engagement

My Father’s Gifts

My father’s early passions were sport and music, but he later settled on a career in international sales and marketing. On a couple of occasions while living and working in Dubai, my father’s employer sponsored music concerts in the 1990s with artists such as Ravi Shankar and Zakir Hussain, who bridged East and West in what is today known as the genre of world music.

Pandit Shri Ravi Shankar graciously signing autographs in Dubai, UAE. Photo credit: Unknown. 1990s.

As a teenager, I accompanied my father and mother to both these concerts and was fortunate to have shared a moment with the late maestro Ravi Shankar. He was an icon not only in the worlds of Indian classical music but in the fusion of Western and Eastern music. Though I do not play a musical instrument, my love for music and enjoyment of listening to a broad range of music played a significant role in my recoveries both as a child and adult.

Pandit Shri Ravi Shankar, generously sharing his time with audience members in Dubai, UAE. Photo credit: Unknown, 1990s.

Today is Pervez Sarwar Mohammed’s – my father’s 70th birthday – and I would like to thank him for the many gifts and opportunities he has enabled and bestowed upon me. We wish him lots of love, good health and happiness in the years ahead.

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Filed under Community Development, Education, Leisure, Networking, Peace Building, Private Public Partnerships, Psycho-Social Support, Recreation, Rehabilitation, Stakeholder Engagement, Youth Development

Market Opportunities: Will eSports be a GameChanger for Squash?

A couple of months ago, I attended a seminar hosted by MIT Enterprise Forum in Cambridge, Massachusetts on “The eSports, Gaming and Blockchain Technology Revolution,” sponsored by the law firm of Hamilton, Brook, Smith and Reynolds. My prior limited knowledge on the subject matter, enabled me to takeaway that eSports is another means to amplify the sport of squash in a crowded sports and entertainment market with short-attention spans from fans, viewers and sponsors. Though, squash was not selected for inclusion in the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo, the door remains open for the World Squash Federation to make its bid for the 2024 Olympics in Paris and failing that the 2028 Olympics in Los Angeles.

Over a 26-year span of immersing myself in the global squash community through various roles as an amateur player, volunteer, coach and administrator, I, along with the more than 20 million squash players worldwide, wish to see the sport of squash designated an Olympic sport by the International Olympic Committee. Many (including non-squash players) consider squash to be a “true-sport,” unlike “eSports,” which has recently become a multimillion dollar industry attracting major sponsorship. The target customers of eSports are mostly young people, but the industry also has the potential to reach stay-at-home parents, “differently-abled” athletes, career professionals-in-transition and senior citizens with extra time on their hands to participate in leagues and tournaments.

In recent years, the Professional Squash Association has made limited attempts to license squash video games to bolsters its marketing efforts to capture the “eye-balls” of both current and potential squash fans. My prediction for 2019 and beyond is that, if there are any serious technologists, publishers or members of the gaming community, who possess the know-how to develop, market and sell a world-class gaming squash product (without violence as the premise which in the case of squash is a gentleman’s sport) there is a good possibility for a win-win of squash’s inclusion in the Olympic Games as well as developing a profitable eSports business leader. eSports will never be able to replace the skill, athleticism and mental fortitude that the real sport of squash requires but it can help capture the public’s sporting imagination to expand squash’s audience.

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Filed under Capacity Buidling, Community Development, Conferences, Corporate Social Responsibility, Leadership, Leisure, Networking, Olympic, Paralympic, Private Public Partnerships, Professional Development, Recreation, Squash, Stakeholder Engagement

Celebrating World Environment Day at Planet Fitness

On, June 5, the international community will celebrate 2018 World Environment Day to encourage businesses, governments and individuals to safeguard the planet with the “Beat Plastic Pollution” campaign. Regardless of where one happens to live in the world, the impact of climate change is real and the need for humans to protect themselves and adapt to climate change is important. In the spirit of Arthur Ashe, who was once quoted as saying “start where you are. use what you have. do what you can,” or in other terms, acting locally while thinking globally. As part of my weekly activities, I enjoy regularly working out at the local Planet Fitness gym in the Town of Andover, Massachusetts. Though there are no squash courts at the facility or group exercise classes, it provides a “judgement-free zone” for general strength and conditioning.

At entrance to Planet Fitness in Andover, Massachusetts, 2018. Photo credit: Planet Fitness staff.

When I don’t have access to a car or the weather is reasonably good, I like to walk to the gym. Striving to being smart and green on an individual level can feel like a drop in the ocean, however if there were a critical mass of individuals doing this then the impact on the environment would be less damaging. As a multinational business, Planet Fitness positions itself as an American franchisee of fitness centers however it could do more by partnering with other environmental groups, such as the Green Sports Alliance, and promote better nutrition by serving healthy snacks, like fruit cups during its community membership activities.

Meanwhile, the Boston squash community has stepped up its game in the arena of sport and environmental sustainability. In September, 2014 Sydney Soloway, a Dana Hall School alumnae founded a wonderful environmentally friendly initiative called Squash Cares, a nonprofit, squash ball recycling program to benefit people with disabilities specifically, autism and ADHD.  The concept of keeping old squash balls out of landfills is a very practical environmental solution for a sport played in more than 145 countries. Any high school or college squash program in the world should take note of Squash Cares, as an innovative squash ball recycling program benefiting people with disabilities.

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Filed under Capacity Buidling, Coaching, Community Development, Corporate Social Responsibility, Education, International Development, Leadership, Networking, Philanthropy, Private Public Partnerships, Public Policy, Squash, Stakeholder Engagement, Youth Development

What Role Can ICTs Play to Improve Sport Governance?

In 2001, the International Year of Volunteers, Kofi Annan, former Secretary General of the United Nations, stated that “volunteerism is the ultimate expression of what the United Nations is all about.” Fifteen years ago, in 2003, I set forth from Boston, Massachusetts on my United Nations Volunteer assignment in Kampala, Uganda under the auspices of the United Nations Information Technology Service (UNITeS) – an initiative envisioned by the Secretary General – to support efforts to bridge the global digital divide. Since returning from my UNV assignment, I continued to be engaged with various volunteer projects in the United States and across the world, with an emphasis on sport for development and peace.

Upon re-reading my 2002 personal statement to the Cisco Least Developed Countries (LDC) Initiative of which UNITeS was a key partner, I am glad to have been asked by the hiring managers to undertake such a writing exercise. Any hiring manager who wants to narrow down their selection of strong candidates, would do well to request a personal statement. Not only does this tool allow for benchmarking but it can also help individuals (and organizations) set future goals. I am making my personal statement public for the purpose of knowledge management to improve education and learning while addressing the challenges of sustainable development, of which ICTs play an important role.

My Pin Collection from United Nations Volunteers (UNV), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and International Olympic Committee (IOC). Photo credit: T.Mohammed, 2018.

In 2018, major news headlines posed big questions about democratic freedoms and the role of the Internet and social media. Through the Kofi Annan Foundation, Kofi Annan founded the Global Commission on Elections, Democracy and Security and recently published an op-ed which addressed the challenges to the integrity of the electoral process for high-income and low-income countries. The findings of the Commission will be released in the coming months. While I have no direct contact with inner workings of the Foundation, the outcomes from the Global Commission can have a significant influence on the political, economic and social systems of international sport governance.

Sport for development and peace is very much at the heart of democratic institutions, such as the International Olympic Committee which strives to promote universal values enshrined in the Olympic Charter. The role of the Internet and social media are often described as tools to provide access to information on programs and projects that uphold Olympic values. I do believe that greater access to information and transparency preserve the integrity of the sport for development and peace sector. However, I also believe in the need for a system of checks and balances in the areas of corruption, terrorism and crime, which the International Center for Sport Security (ICSS) aims to fulfill. ICSS and its partners are identifying weaknesses in systems of sport governance and leveraging ICTs to protect and serve the cause of peace, development and human rights. The Internet and social media will continue to evolve and so citizens will learn to adapt to new ways of living, working and playing.

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Filed under Conferences, Conflict Resolution, Corporate Social Responsibility, Education, Foreign Policy, Gender, International Development, Leadership, Networking, Olympic, Paralympic, Peace Building, Private Public Partnerships, Professional Development, Public Policy, Stakeholder Engagement, Volunteering, Youth Development

Keep It Simple Student (KISS) Through a Healthy Lifestyle

Since approaching middle-age, I am learning more about the importance of both physical health and mental health through conversations with educators, artists, entrepreneurs, caregivers and medical professionals. It is really about balancing both and checking in with yourself, a friend, colleague or medical professional, if needed. The advice of a former Jeddah Prep and Grammar School swim coach was to “Keep it Simple Student,” or (KISS) in short which is a coaching philosophy based on avoiding complexity and focusing on doing a few things really well both in and out of the pool. Upon living in Massachusetts, I was impressed by the quality of the track and field at Danehy Park (seen below) which prompted me to remember Mr. Sither, a former Physical Education Teacher.

Danehy Park, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Photo Credit: T. Mohammed, 2017.

While enrolled at Kodaikanal International School (KIS) in India during the 1990s, our Physical Education class consisted of partaking in what was then called the United States’ Presidential Physical Fitness Award program. This program entailed passing various physical tests in strength, agility and conditioning for maintaining an active and healthy lifestyle. Seen below are my awards from the Presidential Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition sponsored by the Department of Health and Human Services. From a a coaching and policy standpoint, the Squash+Education Alliance and other sport-based programs would do well to integrate themselves with the Presidential Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition.

Presidential Physical Fitness Awards earned by Tariq Mohammed. Photo Credit: T. Mohammed, 2018.

For individuals seeking to maintain or improve mental health, the physical fitness awards can be instructive when having anxiety, paranoia or thought disorders by counting out aloud the numbers, 1, 2 and 3.  As I get older I have found that the simpler the activity or exercise the better I feel. This might not work for everyone, but if an individual finds a routine or activity that helps them maintain both physical and mental health then this will stand them in good stead. Not to sound too prescriptive, but from a policy perspective the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) would also do well to mainstream their programs with coaches, teachers and educators at the Squash + Education Alliance. I am writing based on personal and professional experience and perhaps this will be of help to future student-athletes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under Capacity Buidling, Coaching, Community Development, Education, Foreign Policy, Gender, Leadership, Leisure, Networking, Planning, Private Public Partnerships, Psycho-Social Support, Public Policy, Rehabilitation, Squash, Volunteering

A Sign for New Beginnings

Thanks to my uncle, Tawheed Hazarika, one of my local volunteering stints was with the Andover Village Improvement Society (AVIS). This enabled me to discover the conservation efforts in the Town of Andover, Massachusetts while improving upon my prior knowledge of conversation when gorilla tracking in Uganda’s Bwindi Impenetrable Park. The gorillas are amazing creatures, but given the distance, I could not replicate my African safari so my AVIS volunteer opportunity was the next best thing. I learned about the various trails, vegetation and waterways closer to home. Goldsmith Woodlands, one of the trails led to the sign post below. Since discovering this trail, I have taken many refreshing walks along  AVIS trails in the vicinity.

Goldsmith Woodlands, Andover Village Improvement Society. Photo credit: T. Mohammed, 2017.

When reading this sign I questioned my wanderings across Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas. As mentioned, I realize I am very fortunate to have studied, lived and worked in many countries, which I believe, are now part of my DNA. It is sort of fitting that I found this sign in Andover, MA which has been a wonderful base to explore the world after my undergraduate graduation. My understanding and reading of this sign is that it is an indication for me to make a new beginning. Every ending means a new beginning.

The United Nations Office of Sport for Development and Peace has aligned itself with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals to be met by 2030. Therefore, it is time for me to take stock of all my blogging and lessons learned to apply myself in a real, self-motivated and practical position. I have a keen sense of the what I’d like to do, but the where and when remains to be seen. I’ve been writing this blog for 8 years which is the equivalent of 2 Presidential terms in the United States with a blog posting, approximately once a month. My hope is that it can be a basis for publishing a book or memoir in the future. Gracias, Merci, Weebale, Efcharisto and Thank you for watching and reading! Bon voyage!

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Filed under Education, Foreign Policy, International Development, Leadership, Leisure, Networking, Philanthropy, Planning, Poverty, Private Public Partnerships, Psycho-Social Support, Recreation, Rehabilitation, Stakeholder Engagement, Volunteering