Category Archives: Youth Sport

Coaching Up!: A Coaching Methodology for Multiple Contexts

It is not very often that someone you have never met from the coaching profession sends you a thank you gift in the mail. What made it special was that it was a thank you gift from, Jordan Fliegel a fellow Bowdoin alumnus, who has combined his passions for leadership, sport and business to create a profitable enterprise called CoachUp. Based on my knowledge of the coaching landscape in the United States, CoachUp is the only for-profit enterprise that addresses the market gaps in multiple sports through private coaching.

Thank You Gift from CoachUp. Photo credit: T.Mohammed, 2017.

Thank You Gift from CoachUp. Photo credit: T.Mohammed, 2017.

Jordan’s accomplishments in the classroom, on the court and now in the business of sport are no doubt impressive. His latest book titled “Coaching Up: Inspiring Peak Performance When it Matters Most,” gives readers a clear sense of Jordan’s model for coaching in both sport and non-sport settings. The coaching methodology he espouses enables coaches to build authentic connections, give genuine support and communicate concise directions. If I were a student or practitioner in coaching, looking to gain new approaches and methodologies then, this easy-to-read book would be worthy of your time.

Furthermore, if you are a coach, parent or volunteer looking to provide or procure private coaching to athletes of all ages, then consider booking an appointment with a CoachUp provider. The CoachUp platform is intuitive, secure and safe. All the CoachUp coaches have background checks and have access to insurance for greater customer satisfaction. Thanks Jordan and the rest of the CoachUp team for a copy of your latest publication and enabling private coaches and athletes to seek better results in sport and life.

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Filed under Capacity Buidling, Coaching, Community Development, Education, Leadership, Literature Review, Professional Development, Youth Development, Youth Sport

What Happens to Athletic Coaches Living with Mental Illness?

I was diagnosed with schizo-affective disorder in 2014 after 2 psychotic episodes in my early to late twenties when I literally lost touch with reality. Thanks to excellent treatment by mental health professionals and unconditional support from my caregivers, I was able to go back to work, but relapsed in my late thirties after two suicides in my family and social networks. A  few life changes later, I was unable to follow instructions, process information and became socially anxious. Today it is a burden for me and my loved ones that I need to undergo rehabilitation and find a new direction for my life.

The world of sport is not immune to mental illness as it can strike anyone regardless of age, race or socio-economic background. There are many professional athletes who struggle daily with their illnesses. Some athletes, are open about their diagnoses while others suffer in silence. Unfortunately, the stigma of mental illness does not align well with high performance situations. Athletes, musicians and entertainers are no different from any other human beings on this planet. A 2012, New York Times article titled “With no one looking, mental illnesses can stay hidden,” prompts me to ask the question about what are the long term outcomes of athletic coaches with mental health conditions?

Visit to United States Olympic Training Center, Colorado, Colorado Springs. Photo credit: T. Mohammed, 2008.

Visit to United States Olympic Training Center, Colorado, Colorado Springs. Photo credit: T. Mohammed, 2008.

My illness has no cure and it is something I will have to manage carefully for the rest of my life, by taking medication and undergoing therapy. During the summer of 2008, my sister Miriam, invited me to visit Colorado where I visited the United States Olympic Center’s Training Center in Colorado Springs. At the Center, I saw the above inspirational quote by Juan Samaranch, former President of the International Olympic Committee. This resonated with me since my life has been enriched with, through and by sport. Setbacks occur, but life goes on. My onward journey will be to practice greater self-care and be a resource for others with mental illness, in a voluntary capacity, whenever possible.

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Filed under Coaching, Education, Poverty, Psycho-Social Support, Recreation, Rehabilitation, Youth Development, Youth Sport

Concerts for Sport for Development and Peace?

A few years ago I blogged about what the field of sports for development and peace can learn from the arts? Music is often considered a great communication tool to bring people together. There have been many types of benefit concerts during my lifetime. The LiveAid, Farm Aid and Live 8 concerts are some of the larger benefit concerts that have happened across the globe. Patrick Kabanda, a friend at the Office of the Chief Economist at the World Bank, has written extensively about the importance of the arts to economic and social development. His publications offer great insights.

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I recently attended a Lampedusa, a Concert for Refugees in Boston at the Berklee College of Music. It was a sold out show with humorous dialogue and well crafted songs by all the musicians. Clearly, such an event is a win-win situation for the musicians, fans, sponsors and aid recipients. Small scale concerts may be just as good as large scale events in that they can draw loyal fans and supporters. Professional athletes and musicians are often grouped together in the entertainment business which may lead to ease of working together. Personally, the Lampedusa tour stop in Boston, happened to be on my birthday which made it all the more special and memorable.

As a member of the International Sport for Development and Peace Association (ISDPA), I would urge my colleagues in the field to explore ways in which benefit concerts can be used as a fundraising tool to benefit disadvantaged athletes. Choosing which non-governmental organization to benefit from the concerts could be done based on pooling of resources. For example ISDPA, could collect the funds and make equal distributions to its member organizations. In the United States, Up2Us, a sport-based youth development coalition would be a good starting point. An event organizer, may ask is there a demand for such a concert to benefit disadvantaged athletes? My answer would be, just ask around and you never know if there are a group of musicians passionate about similar issues.

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Filed under Capacity Buidling, International Development, Leadership, Leisure, Networking, Peace Building, Philanthropy, Poverty, Private Public Partnerships, Youth Development, Youth Sport

Coastal Cities and Towns: What role do they play in Promoting Boating for Recreation or Sport?

Since taking a break from coaching squash – an indoor winter sport in New England – I have had the opportunity to explore outdoor recreational and sporting activities this summer. Being on the water in the summertime can be very invigorating and many New Englanders are avid sailors, rowers and yachtsmen. Most of the coastal cities or towns in this area have some type of community boating program.

I was born in Dubai – a port city in the United Arab Emirates and have traveled through many coastal cities and towns over the years in New England and overseas. Some of these stops include Maine, Connecticut and Rhode Island in New England and Kochi, Kolkatta and Mumbai in India to name a few. One recent stop included New York City at Chelsea Piers (see below) where on the Hudson River New Yorkers and tourists could rent yachts, sailboats and windsurfers for recreational purposes.

Visit to Chelsea Piers, New York, summer 2016. Photo credit: unknown.

Visit to Chelsea Piers, New York, 2016. Photo credit: unknown.

Coastal cities and towns be they in New England or not play an important role in promoting tourism, leisure and economic development. Community boating programs are another means in which to foster community, share common experiences and develop new friendships. Coastal cities and towns also promote competitive water sports such as the Volvo Ocean Race or off-shore Powerboat Racing. Of course there are some within the sporting world who are purists and might question the athleticism required to partake in such activities.

Youth sport specialization and the desire to compete at the collegiate level places a considerable burden on families in terms of time, money and energy which can lead to a very narrow focus in their child’s education.  Perhaps specialization, limits a coach’s ability to see other perspectives, especially when trying to coach their own sport if they grew up with just one or two sports. Just as youth sport researchers and advocates urge parents not to let their children specialize in sport too early, I think the same could go for coaches in that they may benefit from coach observations and learning from other sports to improve their own coaching toolkit. In short, quality coaching is a mix of science and art that enables students to reach their full potential.

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Filed under Coaching, Community Development, Education, Leisure, Private Public Partnerships, Recreation, Stakeholder Engagement, Youth Sport

Kodaikanal International School Alumni Acknowledged for Community Service in India

Earlier in the year, I traveled almost 24 hours door to door from Andover, Massachusetts to Peermade, Kerala, India to see my maternal grandparents who were not keeping good health and (and have since March 2016 stabilized their health in old age and God-willing will continue to do so). As mentioned in an earlier blog post, it was an opportunity to spend time with family members and reconnect with positive childhood memories.

Near the Main Gate at Kodaikanal International School visit in 2016.

Near the Main Gate at Kodaikanal International School visit in 2016. Photo Credit: M. John

My Keralite cousins organized a trip to visit Kodaikanal International School, one of two international schools I attended as a boy. Thanks to Yvonne Dovlo, Alumni Officer and KIS alumni who work to support Khelshala, a registered charity in Chandigarh, India – we were featured in 7 Roads: The Kodai Alumni Magazine – something I never imagined would happen when I was student more than 20 years ago.

Cover of Kodai Alumni Magazine referencing Khelshala Project.

Cover of Kodai Alumni Magazine referencing Khelshala Project.

During my visit to KIS it was great to reconnect with staff, teachers and alumni who I had shared time with when I was a student there. These sorts of visits are “good for the soul” as my uncle – Tawheed Hazarika, likes to remind me. My cousins and I were lucky to get a personal tour of the school and eat lunch in the dining hall thanks to one of the new teachers.

Attending Sunday Service at Kodai School.

Attending Sunday Service at Margaret Eddy Memorial Chapel at Kodaikanal International School in 2016. Photo credit: M. John

KIS prides itself on multiculturalism and tolerance of all faiths and backgrounds which is expressed in the school’s motto of “unity in diversity.” On the whole, I was delighted to see the campus so well maintained with many improvements too. It was also great to briefly meet Corey Stixrud, Principal of KIS and to know that the school is continually striving for and meeting the educational needs of the next generation of Indian and international students.

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Filed under Community Development, Education, Networking, Philanthropy, Stakeholder Engagement, Uncategorized, Youth Development, Youth Sport

Reflect, Renergize and Restart: Where to Next?

         As you are probably aware this blog is outdated and no longer being updated. I didn’t want to stop without being able to reflect with you upon three lessons gained from life experiences, which I believe can be one of our greatest teachers. My hope is that it will help you think about your own life.

         The first lesson was learned while I was a high school student in the United Arab Emirates. This was among the several countries my siblings and I grew up.

         After a long day at school, I decided to go for a run to take my mind off homework. At the time, Laylah, my youngest sister was the only person home. I asked her to let my parents know that I had gone for a run and that I would be back home in time for dinner. Little did I know I would not make it home for dinner that evening.

         I set forth on my usual route with Walkman in hand. (For those of you too young to remember what a Walkman is, it is one of the early precursors to the iPod). My memory of what happened next is unclear. All I remember is waking up in a hospital emergency room and my entire upper body soaked in blood with my mother at my bedside. I have no recollection of how I ended up there.

         From police reports it appeared that while running, I was knocked down and unconscious by a car. Except for the shattered glass that had scared my face and back, there were, fortunately, no serious injuries. No broken bones. No lost limbs. Nonetheless, doctors told me that I had experienced a severe shock to the body and mind (deemed a concussion) and that I would need to miss the remainder of my 11th grade.

         On one hand I was relieved, that I wouldn’t have to take final exams, but on the other hand disappointed that I had to stay home and could not spend time with fellow classmates. During the recovery, I had time to reflect upon the seriousness of what had happened and came to the conclusion I had a near death experience.

         At first this troubled me, but as I thought more deeply I came to understand that I had been given a second chance to live. I felt fortunate to be blessed with a miracle. While not everyone believes in God, I do believe there is a force greater than humanity.

         Some call this force God. Some call it Jesus. Some call it Allah. I’m not a very religious person, but I could not help think about this force. It kept me alive and is why I am here today.  Thus the first lesson, I would like to share with you is that, I believe, we are each here to serve a purpose.

         My second lesson stems from an international childhood and brief career in international affairs. I am an American citizen of Indian heritage but was born in the United Arab Emirates and educated in the United Kingdom, Saudi Arabia, India and the United States. My multicultural upbringing might appear unique, but there are a growing number of Americans and international students, who also hail from diverse backgrounds and venture to and from foreign lands.

         During 2003-2004 I served as a United Nations Volunteer under Kofi Annan, former Secretary General’s initiative called United Nations Information Technology Service (UNITeS) in Kampala, Uganda to promote volunteerism as well as foster peace and sustainable development. Based at Makerere University, a leading institution of higher education in East Africa, I was living in a country with a history of Indophobia.

         In the early 1970s, Idi Amin, a former President of Uganda expelled thousands of Indian immigrants due to fear of economic insecurity for ethnic Ugandans. Fast-forward to present day Uganda, Indians are gradually returning to Uganda – mostly in small numbers – to reclaim their properties.

         Given the historical plight of Indians in Uganda I was anxious as to how I would be received by my Ugandan counterparts. Would they see me as another Indian threatening their livelihood? Would I be considered a naïve, twenty something Indian-American aid worker imposing Western values? Would they just accept me for my ideas, thoughts and actions while being a guest in their country?

         My mission in Uganda was to strengthen and expand the Cisco Networking Academy Program, a global online curriculum for schools and universities across the country. The Cisco program prepares students and working professionals to design, build and maintain computer networks.

         I am not an expert in networking computers, but did have prior work experience publishing research on the intersection of business, technology and policy under the direction of Jeffrey Sachs, a highly acclaimed economist, at the Center for International Development at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government.

         Fortunately with hard work, openness and a willingness to learn about Ugandan culture I was able to build trust among Ugandan colleagues. Living in a foreign country, far away from family and close friends, I learned how to make new friends and appreciate how human bonds tie us together. This is what truly enriches our lives.

          At Concord Academy everyone is valued for their individuality and at the same time their is a respect of common beliefs. Hence, the second lesson I would like to share with you is that while everyone is unique in their own way, we must not forget to celebrate our common values in this increasingly complex world.

         My third lesson is a culmination from my lifelong passion for squash – the sport, not the vegetable (Although after living in New England, I have also grown to like squash soup!). I became acquainted with the sport when my mother would go for her squash lessons.

         Curious to know how this racquet sport was played, I eventually made my way on to a squash court by the age of 12. Living in Saudi Arabia it was also a way to beat the heat and exercise in an air-conditioned room.

         Looking back, squash has opened many doors for me. During my college admissions process Dan Hammond, an All-American squash player at West Point and Head Squash Coach at Bowdoin College, a highly selective liberal arts college in Maine, actively recruited me as a student-athlete. I would not have gained admission based solely on my academics. Squash opened the door.

         Also, my first paycheck in the United States was thanks to squash. During the summer of my freshmen year in college, I worked as a counselor at the Harvard Junior Squash Camp under the direction Bill Doyle, a former Head Squash Coach at Harvard. Squash opened the door.

         During my junior year of college I was invited to attend an alumni function with key donors and was seated, by the organizers, at a table with Robert Edwards, a former President of Bowdoin College and his wife, along with several accomplished alumni.

         Puzzled at first, I came to understand that I was selected to be seated at that particular table, not because of my academic prowess, but because I happened to be co-captain of the varsity squash team under the direction of Satinder Bajwa, a world renowned squash coach who was subsequently the Head Squash Coach at Bowdoin College during my senior year. Looking back, meeting Baj (as he is known in the squash world), was a tremendous, positive life-changing experience.

         Squash has continued to provide many opportunities even after college. For instance I got my first desk job at Harvard, because Geoffrey Kirkman, Managing Director of the Information Technologies Group at the Center for International Development liked the fact that I was a squash player and coach who showed promise beyond academics.

         Again, if it were not for my interest in squash, I would not have been able to coach at various New England colleges, universities and prep schools. Neither would I have had the opportunity to help implement the 2006 Super Series Squash Finals, featuring the world’s top 8 players in London, England.

         Neither would I have received a travel grant to visit a poor village in India to conduct coaching clinics for underprivileged children. I could go on.

         I am very grateful and honored for being involved with Khelshala, a non-governmental organization, that allows me to play a part in helping other students can gain education and career opportunities through sport. Thus the third, lesson I would like to share with you is that don’t underestimate the value of your extra-curricular activities.

         In short, my three lessons for you are: (i) live a purposeful life because you never know when it may end (ii) embrace all the diversity the world has to offer and remain inclusive and (iii) last, but not least, don’t forget to nurture your talents. It sounds simple to say, but, at times, it can be difficult to put into practice.

My name is Tariq Mohammed, which among other things, in Arabic means “he who knocks at the door.”

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Filed under Coaching, Community Development, Education, Foreign Policy, International Development, Leadership, Peace Building, Private Public Partnerships, Psycho-Social Support, Public Policy, Squash, Stakeholder Engagement, Volunteering, Youth Development, Youth Sport

Appreciating SquashBusters and the Future of Urban Squash

Thanks to Tom Hodgson, a veteran teacher of philosophy and coach at Phillips Academy Andover (also a friend and squash colleague), he invited me to the SquashBusters Lawrence end-of-year celebration at Brooks School. SquashBusters Lawrence students, parents, staff, coaches and volunteers had fun with free-play, eating a pot-luck dinner and recognizing outstanding performers for the 2013-14 year.

SquashBusters Lawrence Staff recognizing students for 2013-14 achievements.

SquashBusters Lawrence Staff recognizing students for 2013-14 achievements.

As an admirer and follower of SquashBusters, it was great to be in the company of Greg Zaff, CEO and Founder and his team to share developments about Khelshala in India as well as Kidsquash in Cambridge, MA. Given the National Urban Squash and Education Association’s international outreach to countries such as Colombia, South Africa and India (including Khelshala) – there is a lot of potential in terms of grant making, student-exchanges and North-South as well as South-South collaboration.

Though squash is not yet an Olympic sport, programs such as SquashBusters and the like  – when done right with capable staff and adequate resources – produce balanced, active and socially responsible citizens. Surely this is a win-win for all stakeholders!

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Filed under Capacity Buidling, Coaching, Community Development, Corporate Social Responsibility, Education, International Development, Networking, Psycho-Social Support, Recreation, Squash, Uncategorized, Volunteering, Youth Development, Youth Sport

All Good Things Must Come to an End

Today the Athletics Department at Concord Academy organized an “Athletics Assembly” to celebrate the Class of 2014 student-athletes for their performance over the last 4 years. I was unable to attend the event, but wanted to recognize and thank the CA community members who I did not get a chance to bid farewell.

First, thanks to former CA Athletic Director, Carol Anne Beach for bringing me on board as a squash coach and who, once eloquently reminded me after a tough day of coaching, that “we are all in it together.” Many thanks to current Head of School, Rick Hardy and Dean of Students and Community Life, David Rost for allowing me to live on campus and grow as a house parent.

Many thanks to Jenny Brennan, Director of Athletics and my colleagues in the Athletic Department for being part of teams that won with grace and lost with dignity. I would particularly like to extend my gratitude to Assistant Squash Coaches Marty Blue, Danielle Babcock, Josh Parker, Jon Ross, Roger Hunt and Charlotte Whitmore as well as all the numerous captains of the girls and boys varsity squash teams. Furthermore members of the Athletics Department – Kellie Smith, Reed Young, Mike Bouzan and Warren Samuels – deserve special thanks as well for critical support and programming.

2013-14 Concord Academy Girls Varsity Squash with Coaches, Charlotte Whitmore and Tariq Mohammed.

2013-14 Concord Academy Girls Varsity Squash with Coaches, Charlotte Whitmore and Tariq Mohammed.

2013-14 Concord Academy Boys Varsity Squash with Coaches, Charlotte Whitmore and Tariq Mohammed.

2013-14 Concord Academy Boys Varsity Squash with Coaches, Charlotte Whitmore and Tariq Mohammed.

2013-14 Concord Academy Girls Varsity Squash with Coaches, Roger Hunt and Tariq Mohammed

2012-13 Concord Academy Girls Varsity Squash with Coaches, Roger Hunt and Tariq Mohammed

2012-13 Concord Academy Boys Varsity Squash with Coaches, Roger Hunt and Tariq Mohammed

2012-13 Concord Academy Boys Varsity Squash with Coaches, Roger Hunt and Tariq Mohammed

2011-12 Concord Academy Girls Varsity Squash with Coaches, Jon Ross and Tariq Mohammed

2011-12 Concord Academy Girls Varsity Squash with Coaches, Jon Ross and Tariq Mohammed

2013-14 Concord Academy Boys Varsity Squash with Coaches, Jon Ross and Tariq Mohammed

2013-14 Concord Academy Boys Varsity Squash with Coaches, Jon Ross and Tariq Mohammed

2010-11 Concord Academy Girls Varsity Squash with Coaches, Josh Parker and Tariq Mohammed

2010-11 Concord Academy Girls Varsity Squash with Coaches, Josh Parker and Tariq Mohammed

2010-11 Concord Academy Girls Varsity Squash with Coaches, Josh Parker and Tariq Mohammed.

2010-11 Concord Academy Boys Varsity Squash with Coaches, Josh Parker and Tariq Mohammed.

2010-11 Concord Academy Boys Varsity Squash with Coaches, Danielle Balocca and Tariq Mohammed.

2010-11 Concord Academy Boys Varsity Squash with Coaches, Danielle Balocca and Tariq Mohammed.

Many thanks to Annie Bailey in Residential Life and Don Kingman in Operations as well as the broader residential life team for helping to foster a sense of community. Long live, Bradfordfosoras rex. Many thanks to CA Dining for providing food and a space to share meals with colleagues and friends. Many thanks to CA parents, both past and present for their cooperation in helping to guide their children. Many thanks to CA students and alumni for teaching me to be a better person. Go Chameleons!

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Filed under Coaching, Community Development, Education, Recreation, Squash, Uncategorized, Youth Development, Youth Sport

Khelshala Celebrated International Sport for Development and Peace Day

On April 6, 2014 – Khelshala celebrated their first initiative towards the United Nations International Day of Sport for Development and Peace. For an overview, we encourage you to visit the Khel-Mel event with the theme, “Play Life-Sports for a Healthy Life”.

All age groups were welcomed to the event to participate whole heartedly and take part in lifetime sports, such as dance, aerobics, yoga, athletics, squash, tennis, badminton and table-tennis, which were made available for the day. The Khelshala and Majra children joined hands to commence a day of great importance not only for the Khelshala community, but also for the sports society as a whole. The sound of the Dhols, kicked off the Khelshala march in which a group of very enthusiastic local community members arrived to participate in the walk towards the Khel-Mel venue.

Preceding the march, the dance activity conducted by Mr. Sameer Mahajan, Director of Rockstar Academy, lifted the spirits of the children and energized them for a day packed with fun activities. Along with explaining the importance of dance and aerobics in maintaining health and wellbeing of oneself, he began with a warm up before teaching the children chorography he had planned for the session. The dance session was followed by yoga and meditation conducted by Pinki Jha explaining how yoga and meditation can make their minds sharp, peaceful and also how it can enhance their day to day well being, if practiced regularly. In addition, various athletic activities including hurdles and cone drills for agility over a 50m track were conducted by coaches from Panjab University, Chandigarh. Also, many other individual games like squash, tennis, badminton, and table-tennis were a part of the overall day and were managed by friends and volunteers. Our very own Khelshala coach, Mr. Anil Rathee, also directed a tennis tournament. Khelshala children also performed a street play. This was greatly enjoyed by everybody, especially by the group of St. John’s School children in attendance. Khel-Mel activities ended with a grand finale of tug of war competition.

To conclude the proceedings a small prize giving ceremony was hosted by Mr. Bajwa, Founder and Trustee of Khelshala. He also shared with everyone on how sport can help them to stay fit and healthy. The event coverage was carried out by the esteemed Doordarshan channel, and Langar (community lunch) was served to all attending, courtesy of Village Majra Panchayat.

We were truly delighted to have celebrated this United Nations initiative and hope it served the vision and mission of spreading awareness among the community promoting development and peace. We look forward to a bigger and better event next year. We hope to see you in 2015.

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Filed under Capacity Buidling, Coaching, Community Development, Corporate Social Responsibility, Education, International Development, Leadership, Leisure, Philanthropy, Private Public Partnerships, Stakeholder Engagement, Uncategorized, Youth Development, Youth Sport

Kidsquash Alum On a Roll

Today, on the 118th Boston Marathon, I am proud to blog in the spirt of “Boston Strong” about Joey Raskin Lantos, a Kidsquash alum who “graduated” from the program in 2012, and has maintained his interest in the sport.  Joey showed impressive results in recent junior squash events.

Joey (kneeling on right) “graduating” at the 2012 In-House Kidsquash Tournament

Joey (kneeling on right) “graduating” at the 2012 In-House Kidsquash Tournament

As a 12 year old, playing in the boys under-15 division, he finished in 1st place at the SquashBusters Silver, (April 4-6, 2014). He then continued to win the 3.0 Massachusetts State Softball Championships at the Murr Center at Harvard (April, 10th, 2014) and traveled to play at the Junior Silver National Championships in Philadelphia, PA (April 11-13, 2014), where he finished in first place overall for the boys under-13 division.

Joey thriving at the Junior Silver National Championships in Philadelphia, April, 2014.

Joey thriving at the Junior Silver National Championships in Philadelphia, April, 2014.

He continues to work on his game weekly with Seth Packard, former Lead Coach at Kidsquash at the Z-Center MIT squash courts. Joey and his dad Steve Lantos, a long-time teacher at Brookline High School, “think back to Kidsquash fondly.”  All, I can say is this reconfirms the notion, “it takes a village” to support the positive growth and development of youth.

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Filed under Capacity Buidling, Coaching, Community Development, Education, Leisure, Recreation, Squash, Stakeholder Engagement, Youth Development, Youth Sport